Competition: Solve the traffic nightmare!!

Do you have the solution to the traffic nightmare? The Beijinger is running a competition inviting all to vent their frustration and solutions to the congestion.

Long-time Beijing expat Jeremiah Jenne in his Jottings from the Granite Studio blogged his frustration over Beijing's notorious peak hour traffic. There is everything from the sardine subways, to bus drivers refusing to drive, to taxis with drivers so inept at navigation you need to commandeer the vehicle. In his blog the weary traveler has proposed a 'three-part plan' to somehow alleviate the traffic woes on Beijing streets:

  1. Rush hour premium pricing on taxi's where an extra 5 kuai is added for all travels in and out of the 3rd ring rd.
  2. Removing the hukou restriction for Beijing taxi drivers, suggesting that even most Beijing born taxi drivers barely know the location of their own home or elbow.
  3. Raise the standard of taxi driver's examinations. Forget whether they can speak English, just make sure they're able to read directions in Chinese.

Obviously this person favors the taxi over the other forms of transport. Is it your choice transport (The subway, bus, taxi, moped or the trusty bicycle)? What would your solutions be?

With this in mind the Beijinger is running a competition inviting all readers to become online transportation planning authorities. We want you to vent your traffic frustrations and share your most interesting solutions to the peak hour nightmare. We don't care how crazy or dysfunctional the ideas are, because lets face it, we live in a fairly dysfunctional city.

The person with the most interesting story and solutions will receive a bottle of Chilean Cabernet Savignon, complementary of the The Beijinger staff. Its jammy complexities and gridlocked palate (as reviewed by connoisseurs) will be the perfect drop when you eventually arrive home from work.

All responses can be made in the comments section at the bottom of this post.

Good luck and happy venting everyone!

Comments

The #1 rule I would enforce is an incentive to clear the scene of minor fender-benders, which in my experience cause close to 1 out of every 3 jams in the city.

How many times have you been in a 30-minute backup, only to discover when you reach the head of the line that the cause of the backup are two assholes whose cars brushed up against one another and have no visible damage, but the insist on leaving their cars in the precise spot the damage occurred, jabbering about whose fault it is and awaiting the arrival of some sort of adjudicator?

Here's what I'd do:

1. Mandatory collision insurance on all vehicles.

2. "No fault" insurance -- aka the damages are taken care of by insurance. However, if you are involved in any sort of fender-bender, both parties -- regardless of fault -- have points taken away on your license and an automatic RMB 500 fine. And of course your insurance premiums will go up if you are involved in an accident.

3. Mandatory immediate clearing of all non-injury traffic accidents. Anyone whose vehicles remain at the scene of the accident for any period of time will automatically lose their license for one month. Second time offenders will lose their license for a year, and third time offenders will have their testicles removed at the scene with a pair of rusty pliers.

Books by current and former Beijinger staffers

http://astore.amazon.com/truerunmedia-20

so crzay,that's lucky for me to move a new apartment

Remove cars of a certain age from the roads.

Crush them into scrap metal, use this material in the building of further subway lines.

Remove cars of a certain "quality" from the roads, ie: QQ, Xiali, City Baby, etc. They are death traps anyway.

Crush the cars.

Increase the fine for driving on a day you are not allowed to drive.

Increase the price of license plates/insurance so that only the relatively well off can drive. The poor people can ride their bikes, take the subway or take the bus.

Begin an investigation to root out all the people driving with fake licenses and fake license plates. Put them in jail or fine the shit out of them.

Irish coffee, and Irish car bomb
A fat drunk jew starts singing this song
I take a closer look and the fat guy is me
So I buy him a shot, and he buys me back three

Sorry, I forgot one, the city center/CBD should be a no private car zone.

We'll need parking lots near subway/taxi/bus stations so that people can pay for parking then commute to the CBD if that's where they work.

Irish coffee, and Irish car bomb
A fat drunk jew starts singing this song
I take a closer look and the fat guy is me
So I buy him a shot, and he buys me back three

herojuana wrote:
Remove cars of a certain age from the roads.

Crush them into scrap metal, use this material in the building of further subway lines.

... with the drivers still inside them

Books by current and former Beijinger staffers

http://astore.amazon.com/truerunmedia-20

Simply enforcing ALL the rules at a level of only 10% would substantial improve driver behavior here, which is the main reason for the slow moving traffic in my opinion

Really reserve one way for buses and have more bus.If every suburbs citizen could be sure to get to the city faster than any driver there wouldn't be so much single drivers driving -too- big cars.

I think driving is great. I love driving. Cars are an essential part of civilization, and we should not limit vehicle ownership or license registration if we expect China to be a GREAT COUNTRY. The government should subsidize fuel costs and bring back the tax subsidies for owners of small-engine vehicles, which really pollute less and can fit into tighter spaces so they don't really contribute to any traffic problems. Did you know the invention of the auto-mobile corresponds with the emergence of the awesome Western military-industrial complex? It is sort of like having a gun in your pants. (That is a metaphor.) Sometimes I go home at night and put my car inside my girlfriend. Yes, I have a girlfriend! I love my car.

^^^ …yeah, that needs to change.

joshofbass wrote:
Simply enforcing ALL the rules at a level of only 10% would substantial improve driver behavior here, which is the main reason for the slow moving traffic in my opinion

i disagree. the concept of partial enforcement is exactly the issue here -- driving habits are out of control due to the fact that the law is only partially and unevenly applied -- the super-rich and super-connected have no need to follow the rules, nor do the lower ends of the economic spectrum like "hei che" drivers and the like.

Books by current and former Beijinger staffers

http://astore.amazon.com/truerunmedia-20

antfarmks5 wrote:
I think driving is great. I love driving. Cars are an essential part of civilization, and we should not limit vehicle ownership or license registration if we expect China to be a GREAT COUNTRY. The government should subsidize fuel costs and bring back the tax subsidies for owners of small-engine vehicles, which really pollute less and can fit into tighter spaces so they don't really contribute to any traffic problems. Did you know the invention of the auto-mobile corresponds with the emergence of the awesome Western military-industrial complex? It is sort of like having a gun in your pants. (That is a metaphor.) Sometimes I go home at night and put my car inside my girlfriend. Yes, I have a girlfriend! I love my car.

^^^ …yeah, that needs to change.

where's that from?

Books by current and former Beijinger staffers

http://astore.amazon.com/truerunmedia-20

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