Shawshank Redemption: Did Andy kill his wife and her lover

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Shawshank Redemption fans: What do you think: Did Andy kill his wife & her lover?

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Why is this even a poll?
IIRC, it turned out that Andy didn't kill his wife and her lover after all.

"wcasd" wrote:
IIRC, it turned out that Andy didn't kill his wife and her lover after all.

what evidence in the film indicates this?

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Dude, have you actually watched the movie?

Quote:
what evidence in the film indicates this?

The cellmate the young fella had at the other prison confessed to him IIRC. Not that that stopped two people from voting 'yes'.

Which proves democracy can never work, or something.

Bizarro!

ARRRRRRRGGGGHHHHHHHHH.....

Read-the-story-by-Stephen-King.

Fool.

No-he-did-not-he-was-going-to-but-was-an-easy-frame.

Enough-evidence-based-on-the-apparent-planned-attempt.

Irish coffee, and Irish car bomb
A fat drunk jew starts singing this song
I take a closer look and the fat guy is me
So I buy him a shot, and he buys me back three

"Johnny Laowai" wrote:
Quote:
what evidence in the film indicates this?

The cellmate the young fella had at the other prison confessed to him IIRC. Not that that stopped two people from voting 'yes'.

Which proves democracy can never work, or something.

Here's what I recall:

One convict, Tommy, tells Andy that one of his former cellmates, a whack job, confessed to a crime that is similar to the one Andy's in for.

But before evidence can be drummed up that Tommy's former cellmate was the killer, Tommy is killed by the warden.

Having watched the film several times I'm convinced the filmmakers intentionally left a shadow of doubt as to Andy's actual innocence.

Take the first scenes of the film: they never show Andy driving away from the scene of the crime and disposing of the gun (his alibi), but rather end the sequence with Andy still standing in front of the crime scene.

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I see where you're coming from, but I don't think there's meant to be any doubt by the end of the film.

For one, the cellmate's story has no reason to be in the movie other than to prove Andy's innocence - would it not skew the characterisation for the young fella to be murdered by the warden over something Andy knew to be false? That would make Andy out to be an amoral Patrick Batemanesque character, which would kind of go against the prevailing sentiment.

Also, the scene at the beginning sets up uncertainty in the viewer which is resolved by the aforementioned story arc. If we knew Andy was innocent to begin, wherein redemption?

It's a good movie and that, but one that plays unswervingly by 'the rules'.

Also, I haven't read the book, so perhaps Herojuana can fill us in on what further information we could get from it.

Bizarro!

Not-a-book.

I-can't-get-into-details-now.

Keyboard+endless-procrastination.

Irish coffee, and Irish car bomb
A fat drunk jew starts singing this song
I take a closer look and the fat guy is me
So I buy him a shot, and he buys me back three

Ok, short story - Bachman books etc etc.

Dude, I know I shouldn't say it, but get a new keyboard. Doesn't it strain your little finger to hit the hyphen all the time?

Bizarro!

Short-stories.

Admin,-I-am-telling-the-truth.

Irish coffee, and Irish car bomb
A fat drunk jew starts singing this song
I take a closer look and the fat guy is me
So I buy him a shot, and he buys me back three

good points, JL. I'll admit to feeding a far-fetched conspiracy theory here but I've often wondered if it was the intention of the filmmakers to leave it unanswered

some other points:

-- The prosecuting attorney in the beginning sequences points out that the killer shot the victims eight times from a 6-chamber gun, indicating the perpetrator had reloaded the gun to put two extra bullets, one in each of the victims' heads -- signaling revenge/bitterness towards the victims.

Tommy's recollection of a four-year-old conversation he had with a cellmate says it was sort of a joy killing and that the perpetrator did not have any particular animosity towards the victims.

Oddly, in the film Tommy is mentored closely by Andy -- with Andy teaching him how to read, etc -- but yet never mentions this alleged confession directly to Andy in the hours/days/weeks/months he spent learning from him -- it's only after an extended period that Tommy mentions the alleged confession in passing to Red.

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[quoteOddly, in the film Tommy is mentored closely by Andy -- with Andy teaching him how to read, etc -- but yet never mentions this alleged confession directly to Andy in the hours/days/weeks/months he spent learning from him -- it's only after an extended period that Tommy mentions the alleged confession in passing to Red.[/quote]

Yes, but during the tutoring, Tommy didn't know what Andy's crime was; during lunch not too long after Tommy arrived, he asked Andy what he was in for, and Andy replied that he was an innocent man (and thus wongly imprisioned with the implication that he didn't do anything), using the old jailhouse joke that suggested that all inmates claimed innocence. Tommy only found out sometime later when he asked Red about why Andy was in the caboose.

While the script introduces some ambiguity in the first part of the movie as to Andy's guilt, or lack thereof, I suggest that the movie deliberately avoided the surprise ending or plot twists, or even suggestions of doubt regarding Andy's innocence that the movie might have chosen to portray. Rather, the story dealt with how a man wrongly imprisoned was able to deal with the injustice and still remain unbroken. The movie is basically straight forward - the bad guy gets what was coming to him and the hero finds....oh yeah, "redemption". I also suggest that the title of the movie itself should lead to the conclusion that Andy did not kill his wife and her lover. Perhaps one should look up the meaning of "redemption" in your Funk and Wagnell's? Or of course, just check the dictionary in your computer.

sciency is a whackjob

uu lover

Kiss 3

dallnewboobyl wrote:

sciency is a whackjob

Shut the fcuk up!

美国鬼子

I still stick to my theory that it's intentionally left ambiguous.

Certainly if it was the filmmakers' point to make sure the viewer knows it was not Andy, they could have made the opening sequence in a way as to make sure the viewer could not accidentally conclude that it was.

Plus, the Shawshank Redemption could mean redemption from the cruelty of Shawshank Prison, even for the guilty.

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http://astore.amazon.com/thebeijinger-20