Spring Festival Meltdown: Man Faints When Parents Arrange Date for Him

Chloroform, blunt force trauma to the back of the head, roofies... these methods of rendering someone unconscious can now add one more to its list: the sudden shock at being told your parents have secretly arranged a date for you.

Such is the case for a 36 year-old man from Pingxiang, Jiangxi province who was found unconscious on the T145/8 train from Beijing to Nanchang. Lying face-down with a ringing phone in his hand, the man, surnamed Huang, had fainted when his cousin inadvertently informed him that he was expected to take part in a date arranged by his parents.

Having indefinitely left home five to six years ago, Huang's parents were anxious for him to return home this holiday, and had promised that they wouldn't bring up the topic of marriage, a main reason for Huang's prolonged absence from home. However, Huang's cousin had let the secret slip out when calling him to arrange a time to pick him up at the station, leading him to lose consciousness.

The pressure to bring home a prospective husband or bride is tremendous among many Chinese single adults, an issue that came to prominence earlier this year when it was reported that the front page to a Chinese community newspaper in Australia contained a "letter" from a Chinese mother that pleaded for her son "Peng" to return home; similarily, the issue of marriage was the main reason for the son not returning home.

China Daily reports that a search on Taobao reveals people who are willing to serve as a "rented boyfriend" that will placate anxious parents, but witness such a phenomenon, you won't need to look far: our own classified ads contain listings for people advertising their time this Spring Festival. This Beijinger ad lists services for keeping company during the holiday at RMB 15-20 per hour.

As you congregate with your family this holiday season, be sure to tell them that you love and care for them. Even your daughter's fake boyfriend.

Photos: jxnews, theBeijinger.com

Comments

Funny though that this year I have'nt seen any foreign dudes advertising as 'rent-a-bf' for the Chinese chicks to take to meet mom and pops , so must for entrepreneurship huh!

Does this really look like the face of concern?

alwn1708 wrote:

Funny though that this year I have'nt seen any foreign dudes advertising as 'rent-a-bf' for the Chinese chicks to take to meet mom and pops , so must for entrepreneurship huh!

The transaction or even any mention of money is not allowed upon our personal ad section. If one person is allowed to advertise services for hire there, then other people should be as well. And that's not going to happen. the Beijinger personal ads are expressly for finding love, or at least something that resembles love.

Let's keep the fakery of relationships confined to appearances. Padding, cosmetics, hair dye -- people, your image is yours to project.

It's a thing.

charlesliu wrote:

The transaction or even any mention of money is not allowed upon our personal ad section. If one person is allowed to advertise services for hire there, then other people should be as well. And that's not going to happen. the Beijinger personal ads are expressly for finding love, or at least something that resembles love.

Let's keep the fakery of relationships confined to appearances. Padding, cosmetics, hair dye -- people, your image is yours to project.

Our classifieds? You work for TBJ??

So are you telling me that such ads are not allowed on TBJ?

I think just about ANYTHING goes here on the TBJ, this place has the most relaxed moderation I have ever seen on a message board. If you can't hang with the crowd, you get washed out in a bathe of flames. Advertising to pretend to be some girl's boyfriend would be a very tame post for this place.

Oh yeah....thebeijinger is full of morality. That's why I have seen postings on here fromm people selling drugs!

BumbleBeeTou wrote:

Our classifieds? You work for TBJ??

So are you telling me that such ads are not allowed on TBJ?

As hilarious as this article is, it didn't write itself. Somebody had to do it.

As for such ads appearing in the personal ads, no, they should not be allowed. If the morality of the commentariat is such that an objection is made to such content, because the thinking of the children must be always upheld, then you can flag a particular classified ad for inproper content or for spam.

It's a thing.

Depends on what you mean by "children." Rugrats aren't likely to be reading TBJ; neither are tweens or teens, which pretty much takes care of the usual age groups parents worry about. If by "children" you mean 20-something, 30-something or older "children" who are unattached, much to the dismay of their parents, reading alternative viewpoints is part of growing up. Other than flagging ads because they're annoying or illegal (don't want the gov't breathing down TBJ's necks), why bother flagging anything?

BTW, what's the Chinese equivalent of John Bull or Uncle Sam? Mother Chen? Uncle Liu?

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