All You Need to Know About Dog Licensing and Law Enforcement

The recent report of a dog beaten to death by a group of men presenting themselves as chengguan (City Urban Administrative and Law Enforcement) officials has generated a lot of fear among dog owners in the community.

While no one doubts that this event occurred, what is now being called into question is the identity of the perpetrators of this cruel act. In interviews with the Public Security Bureau, the officers we spoke with were deeply shocked to hear of the extreme measure taken against the dog and his owner for failing to produce a dog license in Sihui. The Public Security Bureau protocol is to bring the unlicensed dog to the police station, or pai chu suo, for holding while the owner retrieves the dog license to bring to the police station. Or, the owner can pay the licensing fee at the police station if the dog is not yet licensed.

The police officers also stressed that chengguan are not responsible for the enforcement of dog registration regulations and had no authority to confiscate or beat unlicensed dogs. Representatives from the Beijing Municipal Chengguang Bureau, with whom we spoke, confirmed this as well. The police officers also noted that the dog-beating incident in Sihui took place on May 24, before any official crackdowns on unlicensed dogs had even begun.

The official dog registration period for renewing licenses of already licensed dogs is May 1 to June 30 each year. Dogs that are applying for their licenses for the first time may do so at any time during the year. All dog licenses expire on April 30 every year, regardless of the date on which you initially registered.

The Public Security Bureau emphasized that owners should always carry their dog licenses with them when out walking their dogs. Should a Public Security or other official approach you about your dog, make note of his or her badge number or ID number on the uniform. You may call the hotline numbers for the Beijing Public Security Bureau and Chengguan Bureau to speak to supervising officers:

Beijing Public Security Bureau: 110 (Chinese & English)
Beijing Chengguang Bureau: 96310 (Chinese)

If you are a foreign national and wish to make a report to the Public Security Bureau, inform the staff of your local pai chu suo that you are a foreign citizen and request the assistance of the Entry-Exit Administration as this is the government bureau charged with supervising all matters related to foreigners in China.

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To help you with registering your dogs, here are answers to the most common questions from dog owners.

Q: This is my first time registering my dog. Where do I go to register my dog and what do I need to bring?

A: Dogs are registered at the same local Public Security Bureau /pai chu suo/ where you are registered as a foreign national or local citizen living in Beijing. Dog owners need to take the following items to their local Public Security Bureau (pai chu suo) to register their dogs:
- The dog (if this is the first time you are applying for a dog license)
- Two, one-inch photos of your dog (head shot from the front with white background)
- Your passport or shenfenzheng ID card
- Your lease agreement or property deed, if you own your home
- For foreign nationals, your Registration Form of Temporary Residence or your Household Registration Certificate (hukou) for local citizens
- An approval certificate from your compound management agent (wuye) or Neighborhood Watch Committee (juweihui)
- RMB 1,000 for the initial registration fee if you live in one of the eight key administrative districts of Chaoyang, Dongcheng, Xicheng, Chongwen, Xuanwu, Haidian, Fengtai, and Shijingshan. Fees may be lower outside of these districts
- RMB 500 for the annual renewal fee if you live in one of the eight key districts above

Q: Do I need to prove my dog has been rabies vaccinated to apply for the initial dog license?

A: No. The PSB assumes that you will pay the licensing fee and then take the payment fapiao and your dog to an officially designated animal vaccination hospital for the rabies vaccination. Legally registered dogs may enjoy a free annual rabies vaccination each year if they present their fapiao and dog license at an officially designated animal vaccination hospital in their district.

For the safety of your dog, your family and the community, we recommend that owners get their dogs vaccinated as recommended by their veterinarians regardless of having a dog license or not. If you license our dog after the rabies vaccination, you can always enjoy the free or discounted rabies vaccination when it is time to vaccinate next year.

If you are renewing your dog license, then you must show proof of a legal rabies vaccination within the past 12 months and bring your official Beijing Animal Health and Immunity Certificate (vaccination red book). Owners will not be allowed to renew dog licenses without proof of an annual rabies vaccination.

To learn more about the official Beijing Animal Health and Immunity Certificate go here.

Q: I heard there is a discount on the licensing fee if my dog is spayed or neutered?

A: All dogs that were spayed or neutered at a legally licensed animal hospital in Beijing can receive a discount on the initial licensing fee or on the annual renewal fee. Please ask your animal hospital for your official spay/neuter certificate. Providing the spay/neuter certificate at the time of the initial registration of your dog entitles owners to a discount of up to 50 percent (RMB 500) on the RMB 1,000 licensing fee. If you are renewing your dog license, discounts of up to 40 percent are usually offered on the RMB 500 renewal fee.

Dogs that were spayed or neutered overseas are not eligible for the discount, as the spay/neuter surgery must have been performed at a legally registered animal hospital in Beijing that can issue the official spay/neuter certificate.

Q: I have a large breed dog but it is still a puppy. Can I register my large dog for a license while he is still a small-sized puppy?

A: The PSB now has lists and photos to help officers identify large breed dogs so this may not work. Furthermore, if your puppy grows to over 35cm when measured from the ground to the shoulder, your license is automatically void if licensed your dog within the eight key administrative districts.

The PSB stresses that absolutely no large dogs may be registered in these eight key districts. In addition, there is a list of 40 breeds of dogs deemed to be aggressive that are banned within the key districts.

Q: I heard I am only allowed to register one dog to my home address. I have two dogs. What do I do?

A: The "one dog per household" regulation in Beijing states that only one dog may be registered to each household address. For owners of multiple dogs, you would need to have a separate household address to register each of your additional dogs. This is perfectly legal and is the solution offered by the Public Security Bureau when asked by owners of multiple dogs. As long as the home address of your relative, friend, neighbor or colleague does not already have a dog registered to it and the property management agent or neighborhood watch committee provides their approval, you may use it to register your dog.

A free information session on "How to Register Your Dogs in Beijing & Safety Tips for Large Dog Owners" will be held at ICVS on June 21.

You can follow ICVS on Weibo, Twitter and Facebook.

Mary Peng is the Co-Founder & CEO of International Center for Veterinary Services (ICVS).

Photo: Mackenzie Black (flickr)

Comments

That's all good and well, but what you forgot to mention was that what the law says, means nothing at all.

We have a licenced husky, less than 35cm tall. Every year, she had her licence renewed. Except this year. When we went to the paichusuo, they refused to renew, saying it was against the law, because she was too big.

Except she's not, and we leave in Tongzhou, not one of the 8 key districts. So even though the law says we can register her, the police made the ultimate decision, and said we can't.

Even when you try to obey the law in China, China doesn't allow you to.

And about your original story, about the dog being beaten to death. Why is 'no one questioning whether it happened'? Because foreigners don't lie?

Your original story said the foreigner in question went to the police, but they did nothing, because they said the dog wasn't legal. But now the police are saying the chengguan had no right to do that. So which is it? Also, why isn't this story in the Chinese media? Chinese social media go crazy over things like this. Wouldn't these 'monsters' have been human flesh searched by now? And where are the other witnesses?

Again TBJ, so easy for you to report something as fact, when all you've heard is a single persons point of view.

That's not reporting. That's gossiping.

Quote:

In interviews with the Public Security Bureau, the officers we spoke with were deeply shocked to hear of the extreme measure taken against the dog and his owner for failing to produce a dog license in Sihui.

I put the chances that there are abusive imposters wandering the streets of Beijing pretending to be chengguan at somewhere around 1%. There are only two really credible possibilities:

1) The story is true, the people really were chengguan and now the police are just shooing you away to avoid having to deal with this or having the story gain momentum.

2) BumbleBeeTou is correct and the original story is partially or wholly bullshit.

I guess there's no way of actually confirming one way or the other, so let's just all pick the version we prefer and go with that!

zhenlai wrote:

Slut, hopefully some country will come and control China and rape you repeatedly so hopefully you will die.

Quote:
Your original story said the foreigner in question went to the police, but they did nothing, because they said the dog wasn't legal. But now the police are saying the chengguan had no right to do that. So which is it?

^ both of you seem to think the chengguan and the police are the same people/govt department.

They aren't.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ministry_of_Public_Security_of_the_People%27s_Republic_of_China

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/City_Urban_Administrative_and_Law_Enforcement_Bureau

Quote:
1) The story is true, the people really were chengguan and now the police are just shooing you away to avoid having to deal with this or having the story gain momentum.

Again, the police are not the chengguan. So the police can (irritatingly) but rightfully say "not my department"

 

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1) Were there any attempts from TBJ to interview the officials, of both departments, for that jurisdiction? Were phone calls made but not returned, letters written but replied to, visits made but doors shut? Has it been verified the killers were in fact employees rather than no-gooders wearing fake uniforms?

2) Were any witnesses around? It seems it would be something which would certainly draw attention. Since it was a morning walk and the sun was up, were there not any witnesses? And if so, were any attempted to be interviewed?

3) How did the TBJ come to know this information (the Sihui incident)? That seems more pertinent than where the owner was employed or his Mandarin proficiency.

4) Is there anyone out there who can substantiate the above claim by a reader that this is not found in other outlets, particularly Chinese-language media? A different reader on the other story thread seems to think another blogger posting this satisfies any desire by readers who want to know more, but blogs owned by persons rather than actual news servies are a dime a dozen. If a blog carries a story that could simply to gain clicks, whereas a legitimate organization which has a reputation to uphold is a completely different category of outlet.

Just a few Journalism 101 questions if anyone cares to elaborate.

Er, no. I'm very well aware they are different departments.

The point is, the cops didn't tell alleged dog owner "sorry, nothing we can do because not our department. According to your 'news' story;

Paul Ryding wrote:
The man said: "... They told me that if I don't have legitimate documentation then my claims are meaningless. The strongest message for pet owners is to be on the look out and to have these documents with them at all times. If you say you're still applying for them, it's meaningless."

Yet, in the above article;

Mary Peng wrote:
In interviews with the Public Security Bureau, the officers we spoke with were deeply shocked to hear of the extreme measure taken against the dog and his owner for failing to produce a dog license in Sihui. The Public Security Bureau protocol is to bring the unlicensed dog to the police station, or pai chu suo, for holding while the owner retrieves the dog license to bring to the police station. Or, the owner can pay the licensing fee at the police station if the dog is not yet licensed.

The police officers also stressed that chengguan are not responsible for the enforcement of dog registration regulations and had no authority to confiscate or beat unlicensed dogs. Representatives from the Beijing Municipal Chengguang Bureau, with whom we spoke, confirmed this as well. The police officers also noted that the dog-beating incident in Sihui took place on May 24, before any official crackdowns on unlicensed dogs had even begun.

The police allegedly told this dog owner they didn't care, because the dog wasn’t registered. But the top cop office told Ms. Peng that the chengguan shouldn't have done that, in which case, why isn't this being taken further?

Paul Ryding wrote:
At that point, the officials told him he was "out of order," before holding him back, beating his dog four times with sticks, and scooping the dog's body into a bag.

So a bunch of guys held him, put their hands on him, and yet he is not looking to press charges against anyone for assault? Sure, animal rights laws in China suck, but if a Chinese person physically laid hands on a foreigner, there would at least be an investigation.

There are so many unanswered questions to this story, yet you are still happy promoting it, just like you were the Salt story, until you were forced by your readers to go back an actually ask some real questions. So again, I'll help you do your job;

1) Were there any other witnesses to the alleged event? Who was the witness that described it as "surreal"?

2) How did this 'English national' know they were chengguan? What certificates/uniforms or other identification did they have to make him sure they were "officials"?

3) Why does he want to remain anonymous? What exactly is he worried about? Why is he afraid that people will know his name?

4) Has this appeared in any Chinese media? Has Chinese social media gotten involved?

5) Has he made a move to press charges against his alleged attackers for assault?

6) Based on the above 'investigation' by ICVS, how does he feel now, based on new comments from Police Authorities?

7) As the Police Authoirty said, we are still within the legal dog registration period. Based on that fact, he has every legal right to press charges or pursue the matter, even if only for damaged to owned property. According to ICVS, they 'interviewed' officers at a Public Security Bureau. Did they talk to anyone at thsi forigners PSB, the one where he was alleged told they didn't care?

So there you go, some inital questions to help you start thinking about a real look at this situation. No, you are not a newspaper, I realise that. But you spread fear and worry by reporting alledged events as facts, with no more than a single witnesses comments.

Do the community a real favour for once, take your staff off bar duty for half an hour, and look into what really happened here.

mtnerror wrote:

1) Were there any attempts from TBJ to interview the officials, of both departments, for that jurisdiction? Were phone calls made but not returned, letters written but replied to, visits made but doors shut? Has it been verified the killers were in fact employees rather than no-gooders wearing fake uniforms?

2) Were any witnesses around? It seems it would be something which would certainly draw attention. Since it was a morning walk and the sun was up, were there not any witnesses? And if so, were any attempted to be interviewed?

3) How did the TBJ come to know this information (the Sihui incident)? That seems more pertinent than where the owner was employed or his Mandarin proficiency.

4) Is there anyone out there who can substantiate the above claim by a reader that this is not found in other outlets, particularly Chinese-language media? A different reader on the other story thread seems to think another blogger posting this satisfies any desire by readers who want to know more, but blogs owned by persons rather than actual news servies are a dime a dozen. If a blog carries a story that could simply to gain clicks, whereas a legitimate organization which has a reputation to uphold is a completely different category of outlet.

Just a few Journalism 101 questions if anyone cares to elaborate.

A poster after my own heart, well said! Good

^ bumblebee, did you happen to read the wikipedia article?

seems to me you are hell-bent on proving that the chengguan couldn't possibly be above the law or do anything except enforce the letter of the law ... when there is overwhelming evidence -- not from expats, not from this dog owner in particular -- that this band of goons oversteps their bounds with such alarming regularity that they are commonly reviled as the worst of all administrative authorities in China (see link to article here).

Oh fuck it, I give up. You're right, bumblebee. Occam's Razor indicates the real story must be that this expat kicked his own dog to death in a drunken rage, then crafted an elaborate story in which he marches into a police station to blame it on someone else and seek justice. Or maybe his expat mates just decided to beat the dog to death for sport and blame it on some Chinese for a laugh.

 

 

 

Books by current and former Beijinger staffers

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I'm with BumbleBeeTou on this one. Ever since I heard about this incident (a friend all the way in England messaged me about this incident) and read about it here, I haven't taken my dog walking outside of my community cuz I haven't had him registered.

Also, if this all I need to know about registering my dog, how come there isn't any kind of pricing list? For most of us dog owners, we'd like to have an idea of how much we're going to have to spend before we go so we don't get blindsided or even ripped off. Perhaps the title of this article should be changed...

troublemaninbeijing,

Quote:
- RMB 1,000 for the initial registration fee if you live in one of the eight key administrative districts of Chaoyang, Dongcheng, Xicheng, Chongwen, Xuanwu, Haidian, Fengtai, and Shijingshan. Fees may be lower outside of these districts
- RMB 500 for the annual renewal fee if you live in one of the eight key districts above

Or perhaps you could just read it more closely.

Many thanks,

Managing Editor, the Beijinger

admin wrote:

seems to me you are hell-bent on proving that the chengguan couldn't possibly be above the law or do anything except enforce the letter of the law ... when there is overwhelming evidence -- not from expats, not from this dog owner in particular -- that this band of goons oversteps their bounds with such alarming regularity that they are commonly reviled as the worst of all administrative authorities in China (see link to article here).

admin wrote:

Oh fuck it, I give up. You're right, bumblebee. Occam's Razor indicates the real story must be that this expat kicked his own dog to death in a drunken rage, then crafted an elaborate story in which he marches into a police station to blame it on someone else and seek justice. Or maybe his expat mates just decided to beat the dog to death for sport and blame it on some Chinese for a laugh.

My god, Admin. Are you and your ‘journalistic goons’ so desperate to divert attention away from your reporting fallacies that you attack people so strikingly, rather than actually address the issues raised??

I never said the chengguan couldn't be above the law, or that they wouldn't do anything illegal. I simply said if their actions weren't authorised, as the PSB seem to have told ICVS, why hasn’t what they did been followed up? Why is there no report of the 'victim' following this up and reporting what happened, to authorities who would be 'shocked' as ICVS reports?

Also, I don't think I said the story as total bollocks. I said there were unanswered question, that I felt you and your people should look to answer, rather than simple report as fact what a friend of said 'reporter' has written.

Paul Ryding wrote:

Or perhaps you could just read it more closely.

Yes Paul, perhaps the poster didn't read carefully. But then, you didn't exactly do what you are supposedly paid to do carefully, either. Maybe you need to ask more questions, investigate more carefully, before writing friends opinions as fact.

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